SOCIAL SCIENCE 

Scroll down for course descriptions. SUMMER ASSIGNMENTS HERE

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MATH   SCIENCE    ENGLISH   WORLD LANGUAGE    ELECTIVES  

3 years of Social Sciences = A-G standards A requirement

  • AMERICAN DEMOCRACY 
  • US HISTORY I 
  • US HISTORY HONORS  
  • AP US HISTORY 
  • ECONOMICS  
  • AP US GOVERNMENT & POLITICS / ECON
  • AP WORLD HISTORY

AMERICAN DEMOCRACY - 12th Grade  • Homework: 0-30 minutes nightly. Grading: 25% individual presentations/essays, 25% journal/daily entries/short answer items, 50% formal assessments once every three weeks (2 total), 50 extra points may be earned by presenting a pre-arranged topic to the rest of the class.

PREREQUISITES Students must have satisfactorily completed World History.

DESCRIPTION The characteristics and development of the government of the United States is the focus of the course: Democracy in the United States as envisioned by the Constitution, and the origins and context from which U.S. modern democracy arose. The class explores how state and local governments are organized looking closely at the events which have forced amendments to theConstitution. 

As the semester progresses, international events will be discussed as they occur. Also examined are the roles the United States plays in world affairs and the domestic impact of these roles. This course depends primarily on readings from a primary source: Magruder’s American Democracy. There will be an integration of subjects, including the traditional blend of history and literature, philosophy, international law, economy and the arts.


US HISTORY I - 11th Grade - Moderate • Homework: 0-30 minutes nightly. Grading: students are assessed in four areas - notebook (binder), assignments, tests, essays and projects, participation. 

PREREQUISITES Students must have satisfactorily completed World History.

DESCRIPTION Students study the major turning points in American history in the 20th century. Following a review of the nation's beginnings and the impact of the Enlightenment on the democratic ideals of the United States, students build upon the 10th grade study of global industrialization to understand the emergence and impact of new technology and a corporate economy, including the social and cultural effects. 

The coursework also traces the change in the ethnic composition of American society, the movement toward equal rights for racial minorities and women, and the role of the United States as a major world power.  Themes include economic expansion, movements for social change (as well as the associated reactions against such movements), and foreign relations.


US HISTORY HONORS - 11th Grade - Difficult  Homework: 30-60 minutes nightly. Grading: students are assessed in four areas - notebook (binder), assignments, tests, essays and projects, participation.

PREREQUISITES Students must have satisfactorily completed World History.

DESCRIPTION This course covers the political, cultural, social, and economic history of the Untied States from prehistoric times to the present. Students will read a variety of sophisticated, college-level materials, including a basic textbook, numerous original sources, scholarly articles, and excerpts from literary works. 

Honors students are expected to keep up with their reading on their own and demonstrate their preparation for class by their active, informed participation in class discussion. They will also take part extensively in debates, panels, and historical re-enactments. The course will also emphasize formal essay skills.


AP US HISTORY - 12th Grade - Very difficult  Homework: 60-90 minutes nightly. Grading: students are assessed in four areas - notebook (binder), assignments, tests, essays and projects, participation.

PREREQUISITES World History is recommended.

DESCRIPTION This course covers the same content as Honors US History, but in greater depth and complexity. It is an in-depth study of American history from the beginning of European exploration to the present. Political institutions and social change are major topics, but international relations, economic history and intellectual history are also included. The AP United States History course provides students with the knowledge and analytical skills necessary to critically assess events and issues in United States history. Students learn to analyze historical documents, including their relevance to a particular issue, their reliability and their importance. The course is conducted as a college course; students are expected to keep up with the assigned reading on their own and demonstrate their preparation for class by their active, informed participation in class discussion.


AP WORLD HISTORY - 10th Grade - Difficult   Homework 3-5 hours per week  Grading Reading and reading notes quizzes, exams, discussion, assignments, essays, openers, analysis of art & artifacts, primary documents, film and oral history.

PREREQUISITES Students be in good standing in their 9th grade academic classes. Strong reading & writing skills are a big help.

DESCRIPTION AP World History will “explore key themes of world history, including interaction with the environment, cultures, state-building, economic systems, and social structures, from approximately 8000 B.C.E. to the present.”  Students will “learn to apply historical thinking skills including the ability to craft arguments from evidence; describe, analyze and evaluate events from a chronological perspective; compare and contextualize historical developments; and analyze evidence, reasoning and context to construct and understand historical interpretations.” 

IMPORTANT CONSIDERATIONS You have to be interested in history and willing to do the reading and note-taking homework in order for this course to work for you. The instructor will not spend a lot of time revisiting the homework in class. We will build upon what you have read at home to do work and discussion in class. Most assignments are done in class so if you miss class—you miss out. The curriculum of AP World is designed to give students a true “world” view.


ECONOMICS - 12th Grade   Homework:  Grading: 25-40% individual presentations/essays, 10-25% journal/daily entries/short answer items, 50% formal assessments once every three weeks (2 total). Extra points may be earned by presenting a pre-arranged topic to the rest of the class.

PREREQUISITES A semester long course introducing the principles of Economics, this class examines common terms and concepts, as well as economic reasoning. Students analyze the influence of the United States federal government on the domestic economy and explore the role of the United States’ market economy in a global setting, and the economic forces driving international trade. The class also analyzes the aggregate economic behavior of the US economy, and where we as individuals fit in this economic system.

DESCRIPTION This course depends mainly on readings from a primary source: Econ Alive! The Power to Choose, a TCI publication. There are 4-5 research papers assigned as part of the semester coursework, which touch on the thoughts of economic-philosophical thinkers and/or specific economic topics. In relation to the principal mission of Asawa SOTA, the class will keep a constant look at the role of art in the market society where we interact.

The class relies on a lecture and discussion format to develop students’ ability to assess and think critically about economic issues and how to interpret those issues. Students gain a basic factual knowledge of the science of consumption, production, and trade. By the end of the course, students will be able to: explain opportunity cost and marginal benefit and cost; identify monetary and non monetary incentives; understand the role of a market economy in establishing and preserving political and personal liberty; work with models of demand, supply, and equilibrium under competition, economic growth, money, and aggregated fluctuations; see how the markets and competition affects goods and services produced; understand the role of the government in a market economy; understand the changing role of international political borders and territorial sovereignty in a global economy.


AP US GOVERNMENT & POLITICS / ECON - 12th Grade - Very Difficult • Homework: 60-90 minutes nightly. Grading: 60% in-class work and participation, 10% homework, 30% projects, test, and quizzes.

PREREQUISITES An interest in current events, government, economic systems. World History and United States History. AP or Honors US is highly recommended in order to gauge handling of workload.

DESCRIPTION This course is an in-depth study of the uniqueness of the United States’ government. Students will analyze principles, structures and policies, and how they influence each other through reading primary and secondary source documents. The course involves study of the three branches of Government, The Constitution, Civil Liberties and Civil Rights, the day-to-day functions of government and the use and effects of politics. Economics concepts are also interwoven throughout the course: Supply and Demand, Advertising, basic Economic concepts such as incentives, tradeoffs, and personal finance, and Macro Economic concepts such as gender relations, racism, poverty and labor history.

SUPPLEMENTAL INFORMATION: Students will read several books outside of their text, including Freakonomics, The Nine, The New Jim Crow, and Hardball: How Politics is Played.